Publications

China Grove Cover

Edited by R. Scott Anderson, MD and Lucius M. “Luke” Lampton, MD

Two doctors in Mississippi bring their love literature to life in their new independent literary journal, “China Grove,” That debuted in the fall of 2013.

Edited by R. Scott Anderson, MD and Lucius M. “Luke” Lampton, MD, the first issue features an exclusive interview with National Book Award winner Ellen Gilchrist and a new short story from her latest book “Acts of God.” Also inside readers will find a previously unseen letter from Mark Twain about an unpublished work called “The Great Republic’s Peanut Stand,” a love letter from Pulitzer Prize winner Eudora Welty to crime-fiction writer Kenneth Millar (Ross Macdonald), with an insight into the entire collection of Welty-Millar correspondence unsealed for the first time just this year, and of course original submissions from fresh writers across the country.
China Grove has deep southwest Mississippi roots. The name “China Grove” is derived from the Old Pike County (now Walthall County) village north of Tylertown.
Single copy issues in print or online are $18.00. Subscriptions are $45 for the first three issues. Call Nancy at the Gazette (601-783-2441) to purchase your copy!
www.ChinaGrovePress.com

My Mama’s Closet

Alice Rhea Mitchell

Little girls watch their mothers all of the time, and every mother has an intriguing boutique behind her closet door. At bedtime or anytime, little girls of all ages will delight in the forty-page book entitled My Mama’s Closet by Alice Rhea Mitchell.

When the little girl in the narrative poem explores her mother’s closet, she spies the corner where her mother has placed items for the little girl to wear. Creatively and carefully, the little girl decides independently, adjusts accordingly, and emerges confidently to reveal the results. Mothers, daughters, grandmother, and not a few dads who love them will read My Mama’s Closet again and again; and many a daughter will visit her mother’s closet to enact the lines of this real-life scenario.

Eighteen exquisite paintings by watercolorist Sheryl K. Perry vividly depict the little girl’s actions, and multi-colored text propels the plot forward with memorable lines that linger long after the reader turns the last page.

$20.00 (plus tax)
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

Holly’s Halo

Samantha Gronmeyer

Samantha Gronmeyer has been storytelling since she was 3 yrs. Old, often gathering all of her dolls and stuffed animals as her audience for hours of creative fun. As she learned to write, she began to write stories in her journal with her own illustrations. Samantha has dedicated her life to dogs, volunteering at the local veterinarian’s office, giving money to the local shelter, and inspiring others to be responsible pet owners. Her dogs now live in a large fenced-in back yard and are all spayed and neutered. Samantha was six years old when she wrote Holly’s Halo @ 2007.
Holly’s Halo is based on a true story about Samantha and her beloved dog. She shares her grief, laughter, and childlike wonder with the reader.
Available now.
$16.00 (plus tax)
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

New Eyes

Lamar Massingill

“Written with remarkable candor, New Eyes is an account of Lamar Massingill’s journey from the fetid world of southern fundamentalism into an enlightened world of inquiry, honesty, and self-understanding. I commend this book to people who refuse to sacrifice their souls on the altar of other people’s expectations and desires and beliefs. In a word, and excellent read!”

——- Clayton Sullivan, Professor of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Southern Mississippi, and author of Jesus and the Sweet Pilgrim Baptist Church.

“Lamar Massingill is unsparing, both in terms of his own honesty and all the truth he has learned from many others. Under the rubric of Beginning an Identity, Shaping an Identity, Claiming an Identity, and Living an Identity, he has retraced the adventure that all great spiritual sages of every culture have undertaken. He inspires us to a similar quest. He illumines the way without lessening the inherent mystery of the adventure. I cannot envision not being enriched by what you find here.”

—— From the foreword by John R. Claypool, author of the The Preaching Event, his Lyman Beecher lectures at Yale University, and the bestseller, Tracks of a Fellow Struggler.

Available now.
$16.00 (plus tax)
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

Una Voce

Dwalia South, M.D.

Una Voce: A Collection by Dwalia South, M.D.

About the author:

For the past 30 years, Dwalia South, M.D. Has been a family doctor in her birth place of Ripley, Mississippi. She served as the President of the Mississippi Academy of Family Physicians 1999-2000, and as President of the Mississippi State Medical Association in 2007-2008. She has been honored as the Mississippi State Family Physician of the Year, and for the past several years has served as Chair of the Publications Committee at the JOURNAL MSMA. Residing in rural Tippah County Mississippi, Dwalia continues her active clinical practice, and maintains the Green Hills family farm along with her two sons, Jesse and Jack. She is married to musician Roger Yancey.

“Bravo! Dwalia South’s essays are delightful, touching and irreverent. Whether she’s writing about the comic (‘lowly hospital gowns’) or the dread (the impending death of a mate) or comparing sexual dysfunction to a cranky car, Dr. South is hitting on al cylinders.”
—Curtis Wilkie, author of the Fall of the House of Zeus

“In a perceptive physician-writer, something rare exists: literary talent combined with intimate knowledge. Dwalia is the best physician-writer in Mississippi; she’s also one of the most versatile and insightful physicians-writers alive.”
—Lucius “Luke” Lampton, M.D., Editor, Journal of the Mississippi State Medical Association

“The poetry and prose of Dwalia South M.D. Speak not only to those of her profession, but to everyone who encounters her work. She was inspired to become a physician by the one known as ‘a good doctor’ in Tippah County, Dr. Jessie Mauney (1893-1985). She has been inspired to be a writer by many authors and most of all by the Creator who blessed her with a talent for expressing herself through the written word. Those of us who have read Dwalia’s words and also know her have been twice blessed.”
—Tommy Covington, William Faulkner scholar and Magnolia Gazette Contributing EditorAvailable now.
$20.00 (plus tax)
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

The Divorcee’s Cookbook

The Divorcee's Cookbook

Ann Carruth Jackson

The Divorcee’s Cookbook Inspiration

After being divorced for my third time in 1983, all my friends told me I should write a book. After pondering this advice for a while, I decided they were correct and settled on writing about the things I knew a lot about – cooking and unhappy marriage! I put away the book when I met my PRINCE. After he passed away, I came across the book and decided to finish it. It is a compilation of new and old recipes that I think you will like. I hope it makes you smile and brings you good times and good food to your table!

“You Have to Kiss a Lot of Toads to find your Prince”

I had been swimming around in the pond of life for only seventeen years when I decided I had found my prince. I married my teenage hero, and, a year later, we had our beautiful daughter Kimberly Ann Este. But, soon, the infatuation that I thought was love dwindled, and we divorced.

Back to my pond. After swimming for three more years, and, at much too young an age to know what love is. I married a toad. A year later, I discovered the toad was expecting a “tadpole” with another woman. Needless to say, we divorced.

“Big Toad! Big Mistake!

Again back to the pond. I swam happily around for fifteen years, and then, regretfully, I married the largest toad in the pond. It was the worst mistake I have ever made. Two years later, the divorce was final, and he remarried.

“Huge Toad! Big Mistake!

I jumped back into my pond, swam around for eleven years, and, finally, met my PRINCE. We married and celebrated surrounded by many ecstatic friends and family. We built our home in a beautiful meadow and filled it with love. I lost my PRINCE three years ago, but the love we had for each other will live on in my heart forever!

The moral of this is:

If you are swimming in a muddy, slimy pond filled with bugs and snakes, no matter what others may think, jump out, shake off the mud, put a smile on your face, go out in the meadow, and find your prince. they really are out there!

LIFE IS TOO SHORT NOR TO MAKE IT FUN!

About the author:

Only Ann Jackson could take The Mallard, a tiny four table restaurant that she opened in 1979, and turn in into a legend. this is where she introduced and shared her signature dishes and recipes. Many of them are included in this cookbook. she delighted her faithful followers, and long list of celebrities found their way to her table. Names like Willie Morris and John Grisham.

The olive skin-ned, charismatic beauty learned her culinary skills from a family of restaurant owners. Her grandparents, uncle and her father opened the landmark Dixie Springs Cafe in 1939. Ann calls Lake Dixie Springs, Mississippi home- and except for the twenty years that she spent with the love of her life, she has lived on its banks. Since his death, she spends her time with two Portuguese Water Dogs, Raven and Solo.

This multi-talented chef is always busy. She cooks, writes, paints, and has now become a self-proclaimed authority on divorce… a subject she should know a lot about.

Carrol Case

Fall, 2010Available now.
$24.95 (plus tax)
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

soul places

Cover

Lamar Massingill

Excerpt from the book:

-From the preface by Lamar Massingill

“These are selected essays written over the years 2004-2006 for the Magnolia Gazette and are recorded in their original form as I have journeyed to the places we all travel at some point in our life journey. At each place, I have tried to share some bit of wisdom that I have found helpful and have offered it to those of you to whom I am deeply grateful, the readers.

“I welcome you with a sense of hospitality as we journey together to those places to which human beings have traveled since our beginnings. If, along the way, I have touched a chord that causes you to resonate, I will be all the more grateful.”

“A protégé to the late John R. Claypool — Episcopal priest and best selling author who praised Massingill’s 1995 book, New Eyes, as ‘a gift’ —Lamar Massingill continues through these essays a ‘confessional’ style of sharing insights into the places human experience will inevitably take us.”

—Clayton Sullivan is Professor Emeritus of Religion and Philosophy at the University of Southern Mississippi and a prolific writer and author.

philosopher, as well as a minister. Such were the words my mother used to describe her then minister at Tylertown United Methodist Church, the Rev. W. Lamar Massingill. Those words fit Lamar well, revealing the depth of his passion not only for the spiritual life, but also for the written and spoken word. Another friend, who never missed a sermon, told me that whenever Lamar spoke at church, “I learned something wonderful and unexpected.” After hearing him speak several times, I cornered him during a church event at my brother’s house and discussed utilizing his sermons in my weekly newspaper, the Magnolia Gazette. I knew his sermons would make a difference in the life of my readers, and I also asked that he assume the job of the paper’s Religion Editor. He was already a reader of the Gazette, already a fan of the award-winning talents of such writers as Dawn Dillon Barrett, Richard C. Wood, and Walter Neil Ferguson. He soon said yes, and it wasn’t long, the November 18, 2004 issue, that Lamar’s first column appeared in the Gazette’s pages. Since that original column, Lamar has garnered an extensive following of readers stretching from the cypress swamps and bayous of Louisiana to the red clay hills of north Mississippi. I can’t tell you how many subscribers begin their praise of the Gazette with praise of that “Preacher Massingill’s column.”

(From the Prologue, written by Lucius M. “Luke” Lampton, MD)

Copies are now available.
$19.95 plus tax
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

Hometown

Mac Gordon

“There have been numerous accounts written and shared about the tragic events of the civil rights movement in the deep South during the 1960s. Each story has its own horrific nature, more often than not associated with a particular geographical location. Through the eyes of a native man, a journalist by trade, we made observers of the sordid behavior that tore apart the city of McComb, Mississippi and its surrounding area. This is a story of stubborn resistance, incredible cruelty, and the birth of new hope.”
–Clay F. Lee
Bishop, Retired
The United Methodist Church

“No one is better qualified to write of the events recounted in this intriguing volume than Mac Gordon. Not only is he a very talented writer but what makes this book so special is the fact that he and his family were eyewitnesses and at times even targets of the terrorism and violence that marked the civil rights struggles of the 1960’s in his hometown of McComb, Mississippi. Because he was there and knew personally so many of the people involved he is able to present this moving account of those happenings with a chilling authenticity.”
–William F. Winter
Former Mississippi Governor

“Only a writer with the skills of Mac Gordon could make readers feel some sense of nostalgia for coming of age in Jim Crow Mississippi. But Gordon’s marvelous memoir that centers around his family’s home area of Southwest Mississippi, moves readers from the hoary verities of that era to tell the stories long buried in the sediment of its supremacist culture. It’s a brave book peopled with brave locals, and it will go no small distance in beseeching Liberty to live up to its noble name.”
–Davis Houch
Professor
Florida State University

About the author:
Mac Gordon is a retired newspaper reporter and editor who also worked in state government communications. His newspaper career carried him from the Enterprise-Journal to the Jackson Daily News, Brownsville (Texas) Herald, Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, Meridian Star, Leland Progress, Albany (Georgia) Herald and the Jackson Clarion-Ledger. He is a U.S. Navy veteran of the Vietnam War. He and his wife, Mary Lee Chandler Gordon, live in Georgia. He has one daughter, Luci Gordon Henry, and four active grandson, Branson, Logan, Nicholas, and Hayes. He also serves as a contributing editor in the Magnolia Gazette.

Available now.
$24.95 (plus tax)
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

Keeper Of The Dream

Keeper Of The Dream

Richard C. Wood

Excerpt from the book:

Being at the Old South in the World

By the Great Alibi the South explains,

condones, and transmutes everything.

-Robert Penn Warren

The fate of the Southerner is to hang
below the curve. He would fall
southerly over the Antarctic wastes and on
into the voids if he were not clamped in
a swamp slithering and bellowing. His
only way out is to adapt his belly
to the sands. His only luxury’s venom.

The fate of the Southerner is to have
his king and all musicians of court
far to the North, secure on the upside
of Earth. They will not take him up,
clean him up, suit him up, civilize him.
They gauge themselves by his misery,
their missioners come to remind of the rule.

The fate of the Southerner is to dream
of dominions of lands with a house which
if built, would fall off the world with him
in it. He would marry a belle, a gully,
a bayou more fecund with snakes than his
own, which by marriage they’d jointly make one,
the Great Swamp of All. The king plans to drain it.

My father loved poetry. He would recite, from memory, poems by Kipling, along with Gray’s ‘Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard’ and Fitzgerald’s ‘The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.’ I began to love the language of poetry and still I love the sound of it, the variety of tone, the sonority, the mysteries and the moods of it. There is beauty in the combinations that can meet, join and fulfill themselves through the many forms of poetry. The result is an arousal of spirit, something that can be experienced but not fully described.

Many of the poems in this volume are theatrical, historical, illustrating the passage of time. Some are occasional, or celebratory— a holiday or birthday. Others are funereal—- etching with sadness the wordly life of humans. As a writer I become interested in an idea, a moment, a character, a place. I want to share these interests in hopes that the mysteries and moods arouse the spirit and engage the mind.Available now.
$24.95
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia St. Magnolia
MS 39652

Journeys to Freedom

Journey to Freedom Guy Geller

Guy Geller

A Compelling True Story of a Young Hungarian Born American Boy’s Tree Year Concealment from the Gestapo by French Supporters

A fascinating, haunting account of the life-death experience of a six year old boy caught up in World War II Paris. Guy Geller relates his efforts to cope with his impossible situation with both pathos and humor recounting events indelibly impressed in his young mind. This is an important addition to the literary history of Jewish life in Europe during the war.” These are the words of Carl Lazenby, Author, publisher and radio personality.

Guy Geller is an award winning columnist and photographer, a frequent guest lecturer ranging from Willamette University in Salem, Oregon to the Heritage Festival in Columbus Mississippi. He has been guest author four times at the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C. as well as that of the Mississippi Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge.

His weekly column “Armchair Ponderings” in the Magnolia Gazette as well as travel columns recounting recent trips to his early homes in Hungary and France have also scored frequently among entries of the Mississippi Press Association annual Better Newspaper Contests.

Geller tried retirement for six years but found that he needed more of a challenge to his life. He has served and continues to serve as Administrator, CEO of Beacham Memorial Hospital for the last six years; in his adopted hometown of Magnolia, Mississippi.

Copies are available.
$22.95 plus tax and shipping charges.
Contact Nancy Morris
Magnolia Gazette
601-783-2441
280 Magnolia Street
Magnolia, MS 39652

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